I think you know what you are doing here... :)
By Ol'Bones
#304773
Thanks guys I think I need another camera. I think you need a thumb to do what I'm seeing! going to check about seeding chestnuts and caging. Thanks for the help. Bones
By Sodbuster
#304778
Thanks guys I think I need another camera. I think you need a thumb to do what I'm seeing! going to check about seeding chestnuts and caging. Thanks for the help. Bones

Don't know what kind of weather you have there, but have your trees had any ice coating? Doesn't take much for it to make them very brittle.
By scdeerslayer
#305038
I thought Chinese Chestnuts didn't produce that well, and that's why the Dunstan chestnut was developed (disease resistance of Chinese and production of American), or is that just part of the marketing of the Dunstan Chestnuts? I might have to see about getting some seed so I don't have to worry about losing a lot of money if/when they die.

As far as cages I've see some made from 4' wire fencing made into a circle about 3 feet in diameter to protect some fruit trees. I don't even think they were staked down. This was to keep bucks from rubbing the bark.

Also, isn't part of using the tubes to insulate the trees?
By yoderj@cox.net
#305054
No, there are many different varieties of Chinese chestnuts that produce well. The American chestnut was virtually wiped out by a blight. It used to be the dominant hardwood in the eastern forests. Dunstan was one of the first American X Chinese trees that was done to try to get as close to an American chestnut as possible while retaining the blight resistant characteristic of Chinese chestnuts. I believe Dunstan was the first cross that received a patent.

The ACF is now working on a 15/16th American Chinese cross.

There is no doubt that Dunstan chestnuts are very heavily marketed to sportsmen these days.
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By mikeinkaty
#305059
I had an American Chestnut on my property. It was pretty isolated and I guess escaped the blight. I took some nuts and leaves to a state forestry service guy and he confirmed what it was. He later saw it when measuring Black Walnut for me and again confirmed what it was. It was on the bank of my creek and about 10 years ago a large flood took it out. I wish I would have collected some of the nuts. Almost all of the timber there is old growth. I've had it for 26 years and the people before for 40 years. It probably has 2 dozen different varieties of hardwoods. Some of the persimmons are 12-14" diameter. Lots of straight grain hickory and KY coffee bean trees. But no Bois-d-Arc! (I wanted to make a bow)

Mike
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By ko4nrbs
#305073
No, there are many different varieties of Chinese chestnuts that produce well.

Which ones do you recommend?
Bill
By yoderj@cox.net
#305077
I'm not going to recommend any. I don't know enough about individual varieties. I ended up going with Dunstan, but when I did my research nut production was not a factor. I can't recommend it since I have not grown it, but Empire is a popular one for wildlife.

Dunstan's are over hyped and pretty expensive because of the marketing. Places are getting $25/tree. However, if you grow your own from nuts, they are no more expensive than any other similar option.
User avatar
By mattpatt
#305289
I got mine from http://www.chestnutridgeofpikecounty.com but they are all sold out for the year. You need to place your order in November when the nuts are falling.
User avatar
By mattpatt
#305290
I did confirm with them that their orchard is made up of Dunstan chestnut trees. Linda is very nice and has always been very responsive to any questions that I might have.
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