I think you know what you are doing here... :)
By NonTypical
#312662
nice looking plot! GJ!
By Steve S
#312663
Age is primarily impacted by letting young bucks walk which probably has the largest potential impact on average body weight. Nutrition can be managed by a combination of food plots, native habitat management, and management of doe numbers.

One companies product, no matter which company or product, is not the driver in increased body weights.


Out of all of the bickering back and forth. The above comments are what I believe as well. Age is far and away the most important factor in deer reaching a maximum weight. Young malnourished deer versus mature well nourished deer could see a good overall weight gain. I do not see the gain being 150 lbs per deer though. Either way, if you are getting 200 pound deer in GA I would keep on doing what you are doing. Even to hit 200 pounds here in WI you are looking at a minimum of a 3 year old buck.
Your right, it takes age, nutrients good habitat, along with many other factors favorable for growth and importantly,members who know and understand the QDM concept, the history of whitetails in Ga is an interesting one and why what we've accomplished as a club in North Ga is something I take much pride in. The deer that were stocked here decades ago in our area are from five different states, WI being one of them, each chosen for and based on their generic makeup have the potential to produce large deer but their needs weren't being met. Both middle and south Ga have always out-produced the northern zone for several reasons, one major reason as I see it is more farm land and farm operations there than in the foothills region where we are and there's much better soil there. You folks in WI and the other Midwestern states have and always will always produce large deer because you have something the rest of the nation can only wish for, the most fertile soil in the nation. Of course many other factors come into play, we were seeing good growth here a few years ago then a drought hit the South and we saw a weight drop for a few years after that. The thing that really got me excited again is a last season shed one of my members picked up a couple of weeks ago, he gave it to me to have it scored, if the other side matched, and I see no reason it shouldn't have, that buck would have scored in the low 160's, while my goal is having strong healthy herds, that got me really excited again! For the record, most of the bucks we take are still in the 150 to 165lb range . In the last three years some over 200 lb bucks have been taken and one doe weighted in 197lbs
#312665
Age is primarily impacted by letting young bucks walk which probably has the largest potential impact on average body weight. Nutrition can be managed by a combination of food plots, native habitat management, and management of doe numbers.

One companies product, no matter which company or product, is not the driver in increased body weights.


Out of all of the bickering back and forth. The above comments are what I believe as well. Age is far and away the most important factor in deer reaching a maximum weight. Young malnourished deer versus mature well nourished deer could see a good overall weight gain. I do not see the gain being 150 lbs per deer though. Either way, if you are getting 200 pound deer in GA I would keep on doing what you are doing. Even to hit 200 pounds here in WI you are looking at a minimum of a 3 year old buck.


I really didn't mean for it to degenerate into bickering. There are lots of newbies that read these posts. I just didn't want one guys hard work to be manipulated into an advertisement some of the most over priced products on the market.

There is a lot of product marketing hype out there. If folks want to buy a big buck, they can always pay to shoot one in a small fenced enclosure. If they want to do QDM, they need to start with reasonable expectations, realize that process starts way before soil tests or food plots with an assessment of the "lowest hole in the bucket", and that the differential impact clover varieties will have on a deer herd are infinitesimally small.

I don't mean to at all bad mouth WI products. They fill a niche along with the other Buck-on-Bag seed companies. They may be the best choice for some small plotters.

Just to demonstrate this is not a WI only issue, here is a recent thread on the QDMA forums looking at a recent Biologic product: http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=64079

Thanks,

Jack
By Sodbuster
#312684
I have a small Durana plot going into it's 8th year. Checked it a few weeks ago and it looked played out with mostly broadleaf weeds and little clover. Sprayed it with gly and looked at it last week and it was turning back into a pure clover stand. At one time I planted 4 1/2 acres of it on 3 properties all with the same result. The deer just never ate it. Even the 8 yr old plot still get's very little use. Switched to my own ladino/alsike/red mix and the deer hammered the plots. Like bowhtr 1 my Durana would go dormant during summer and the weeds would take off, more so than other clovers. Had a Biologic Clover Plus plot side by side with Durana and the Biologic lasted 3 weeks longer. The Durana did survive back to back summers of extreme drought and heat that wiped out all my other clover plots. Planted some Barblanca clover last year that I've been very impressed with. Never had much luck with WI products (been 13 years or more since I used their clover), but Biologic always did great. I've used several other commercial blends and I won't call them a rip off because they do grow well, but after I found out that I could buy clover local, I cringe at the amount of money that was spent on commercial blends. I can understand a guy wanting to use commercial blends when they see a beautiful plot with deer feeding in it. I will still buy commercial blends if they are marked down enough, but try to stick with making my own mix. The deer are my guide on what to or not to plant. They are never wrong :lol: Hope we all have a cool, wet summer.

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