I think you know what you are doing here... :)
By yoderj@cox.net
#339050
A well planned fire can be a great tool in a habitat management plan. We just burned about 130 acres across two days last week. We got good rain the last couple days and it is mostly out. I forgot to take pictures the first day, but a couple game cameras happened to get some. I took some with my phone the second day.

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Thanks,

Jack
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By Gforce
#339053
Looking good, looks like most of it is running with the wind and humility and flame height is just about right for control. This type fire will get rid of the clutter but doesn't stick around long enough to boil the sap around the bigger trees and kill them.
By yoderj@cox.net
#339057
A back fire was set at the break and allow to run for about 20 yards. We then did strips of fire 10-150 feet apart working our way into the wind. Wind speed was 1-6 mph. Humidity was low the first day of the burn but a bit higher the second day. All within the bounds.
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By Gforce
#339061
For a hot fire we'll normally work the Backfire on the break around any corners and danger spots. then fire the backfire break line and let it run about fifty feet and get well enveloped. We'll then work the side-wind break line up into the point we can head-fire it, it's hell bent for leather then. Once you head fire that puppy and get it rolling the fire will create it own wind like a big chimney. It will suck the back fire right along toward the head fire. At that point you just hope you did everything right because it's no longer in your control.

For a cold fire we will strip line just like y'all did.

We just did 500 acres at one pop, with 5 head fires and some strip line in places. I was real pleased with the results. About 200 acres was old growth longleaf where we set the fire to get really hot. In places we had 40 foot flame umbrella and should limb the trees up to about 60 feet by next spring.

If I want to kill brush and small trees I use the Backfire along with strip line burning in the spring after the sap rises, this way the fire stays around the base of the brush and small trees long enough to boil the sap. If the sap boils out, that tree is dead, dead, dead.
By yoderj@cox.net
#339064
Speaking of fire creating wind, we had a great example. The pictures were of a pine understory burn, but we also burned a couple small clear-cuts. The fuel in the clear-cuts was uneven. There were some larger piles of tops in the center but the rest of the cut had enough dirt that fire wouldn't carry easily. It was about 1030 in the morning and sun was just warming it up and drying any due. I wasn't sure it was going to do much good at first. The wind was only at 1 mph at that point and not helping much. Once we stripped to the middle and got some of the large piles started, things changed. They created so much heat that they created their own wind. The suction from the piles was greater than the prevailing ground wind and the fire ran much better.

I'm still learning when it comes to using fire. The burn coordinator suggested that if I take the class, he thought we would have no problem burning ourselves in the future.
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