I think you know what you are doing here... :)
User avatar
By johnnydeerhunter
#341801
I'm with you on the over engineering, been known to do that myself a time or two :D . The pipe is rated for higher pressures but that all changes when you drill the holes in it. It really should be fine, I'm just saying be careful is all, potential is there.
By yoderj@cox.net
#341806
I'm with you on the over engineering, been known to do that myself a time or two :D . The pipe is rated for higher pressures but that all changes when you drill the holes in it. It really should be fine, I'm just saying be careful is all, potential is there.


These tiny holes are well less than 1/8" in diameter. The impact on the structural intregity of the pipe is neglegible. However, the pressure reduction on the pipe due to the air escaping through the holes is significant. 1/2" is rated at 600 psi. Even if I ran the compressor at the full 90 psi rating, I couldn't blow up the pipe if I tried. The suggest pressure for a 50 gal drum is around 20 psi.

Having said that, it never hurts to be careful.... :D
User avatar
By bowhtr1
#341811
I don't think the pressure rating on a drum is anywhere near that. I think <5 lbs. Don't want anyone testing 20 lbs on a drum. I have seen drum expand rapidly and we ran. Thanks for the info for the chestnuts.
By yoderj@cox.net
#341815
I don't think the pressure rating on a drum is anywhere near that. I think <5 lbs. Don't want anyone testing 20 lbs on a drum. I have seen drum expand rapidly and we ran. Thanks for the info for the chestnuts.


I'm confused. There is no pressure on the drum or bucket. The top is open and we are blowing bubble in water here. I have now idea what you are suggesting.

Maybe I didn't explain the concept well. Worm castings are a great source of beneficial microbes. I want to introduce these microbes to the biochar before using it to mix in containers or to amend holes dug for trees in the field. When aerobic microbes are fed and aerated, they multiply quickly. So, the idea of worm casting tea is to increase the population of microbes and then pour the tea into biochar. The water acts as a carrier to distribute the microbes through the biochar.

So, to brew worm casting tea, you add unsulfured molasses (or some other sugar source) to a bucket of water and add worm castings and then aerate the mix for about 24 hours (at temps less than about 70 degrees it may take longer). You can also brew it without aeration if you want a higher percentage of anaerobic microbes.

The PVC diffuser is just a device to create a high volume of bubbles and some churning of the tea. The pressure coming out of the air compressor is only 20 psi. That pushes air out of the holes drilled in the diffuser. The pressure in the bucket is immediately relieved as the bubbles rise and hit the surrounding air.

The pressure on the bucket or drum would be the equivalent of putting water in an open Tupperware container, placing it in the microwave, and bringing it to a full boil.

Or, perhaps I don't understand your concern....

Thanks,

Jack
User avatar
By bowhtr1
#341816
I was over thinking it. I was thinking if you dont have a open top drum you could use a single peice of pvc and put it through the hole in the drum. Have the holes pointed in one direction to get the liquid to swirl using the air. You would get mixing and air. After you are done you can put a spiket on the drum hole and tilt the drum on its side to get the liquid out as you need. Thats where I was thinking on the pressure on the drum.
By yoderj@cox.net
#341823
There would be no purpose in sealing a drum for this. There are other designs. Probably the best is a vortex design, but it is much more expensive to implement. It creates a vortex in the center of the drum.

Thanks,

Jack
By yoderj@cox.net
#342512
The biochar has been charged and activated with worm tea. I'm now testing it with some of my tree. In the mean time, I took an apple grafting class and did my first apple grafting. It looks like my first apple graft is taking.

Image

Thanks,

Jack
User avatar
By johnnydeerhunter
#342515
Nice work Jack, you put a lot of effort into these things.
By yoderj@cox.net
#342551
Thanks John. Apples were near the bottom of my wildlife tree list because of the maintenance. I'm just now digging into apples a bit and striving to find a low long-term maintenance approach. I planted a bunch of crabapples I grew from seed last year. I decided to experiment and field grafted a few disease resistant varieties of domestic apples to them. This was after taking an apple grafting class. The one in the picture was the first graft I did in class. I have a few more bench grafts I've done since then on traditional m111 root stock. I'm more interested to see what happens to the field grafts.

My passion here is wildlife management and hunting. All of these things are tools for me but I really love learning about them. Just like I dug into trail cams until I found a solid solution that would work well for my application, I try to dig into each of these things, learn about them, and then apply them if it makes sense.

Thanks,

Jack
By yoderj@cox.net
#343552
Just thought I'd provide a quick update on the biochar experiment. It was a total failure. I killed many of the seedlings where I used it. I don't think it was the biochar, but my attempt to balance C:N ratio. I think I added too much N. Seedlings that got biochar showed symptoms of N shock. The pawpaws seemed to survive it at a higher rate because they had a root system that was one growing season old. The chestnuts that I started under lights reacted much more strongly to the excess N and died.

There was definitely a titration effect. I had transplanted the pawpaws first and was beginning to see negative effects, so as I transplanted chestnuts, I started titrating down the amount of biochar in the mix. Less biochar had less negative impact on the seedlings.

I haven't given up on the biochar itself, but the idea of balancing the C:N and then directly applying it to containerized trees was a failure. My next attempt will be to mix it into compost and let it season with the compost before applying it.

Thanks,

Jack
User avatar
By johnnydeerhunter
#343576
That's too bad it didn't work out as planned, I guess it just gets chalked up to the live and learn side of life.

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