Use this forum to post questions and issues for discussion related to Browning cameras.
#349887
I put my new strike force pro in the identical spot as my primos truth 02. I set the flash on the strike force to long range,125 feet claimed by browning. I think the browning falls short of the advertised distance. The Primos lights up the area much better than the strike force. Although the Browning takes a wider picture. The two trees in the center of the (primos) photo with the old deer stand support is exactly 99 feet from the camera.

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#349888
The Browning HDPro pic is reporting 1/20th second @ 400 ISO while the Proof 02 is reporting 1/17th second at 1000 ISO. According to what I've observed from the photos of others, the Proof 02 is pretty well maxed out at those settings for long range flash, but the HDPro is being retarded from it's max long range settings of 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO. I believe that the lower tilt angle of the Browning, as set, is preventing it from reaching out further with the flash due to reflective feedback from the ground. You'll have a better comparative test between the two if you tilt the Browning up until it reports back parameters of 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO.
#349891
The Browning HDPro pic is reporting 1/20th second @ 400 ISO while the Proof 02 is reporting 1/17th second at 1000 ISO. According to what I've observed from the photos of others, the Proof 02 is pretty well maxed out at those settings for long range flash, but the HDPro is being retarded from it's max long range settings of 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO. I believe that the lower tilt angle of the Browning, as set, is preventing it from reaching out further with the flash due to reflective feedback from the ground. You'll have a better comparative test between the two if you tilt the Browning up until it reports back parameters of 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO.


You obviously have technical knowledge of how a camera works. The browning camera is actually set higher on the tree (approx. 5 feet) than the primos (approx. 4 feet). The pine tree the cameras are on is strait up and down without any natural leans. The new browning has a adjustable mount that allows the camera to be tilted "downward" only. I wish the mount allowed the camera to be mounted upwards instead, to me that would be more useful. After viewing the photos of the browning I went back into the woods and mounted it even higher, about 6 feet. In a couple of days I will check to see if that makes a difference. So far the flash setting on the browning camera doesn't seem to make a difference in flash distance.
#349892
I would mount the Browning as close underneath the Primos as possible and just put a suitably thick stick under the bottom of the bracket to get it pointing straight out. Like I said above, you'll know when you have it set for maximum flash throw when the picture properties report 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO. It may work cooning the cam further up the tree but it's really the tilt that counts.
#349896
I would mount the Browning as close underneath the Primos as possible and just put a suitably thick stick under the bottom of the bracket to get it pointing straight out. Like I said above, you'll know when you have it set for maximum flash throw when the picture properties report 1/20th second @ 1600 ISO. It may work cooning the cam further up the tree but it's really the tilt that counts.


I took your advise as I checked my camera today. I lowered it a bit from the posted photo below (which is an improvement from the photo posted above) and tilted up upward with a stick. The camera has a viewer which is nice to align with, but its not very big only the size of a big postage stamp. Again, the camera has a built in adjustable mount that allows the camera only to be tilted down. It would come in handy if a tree was leaning in the correct direction. But the way it looks the camera mounted on a strait tree or a forward leaning tree, it must be propped up from the bottom.

Getting better.
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#349897
I have found that forage/vegetation close to the camera and in the picture tends to screw up the exposure. I had issues with my Primos Proof 2 cameras and had to make sure all the vegetation was cleaned out to get the right exposure. You may want to get rid of the pine brand it might help.

Thanks for the update.
#349900
I was hoping to post more pictures today. But I'm having a tough time getting the camera adjusted correctly. After propping the camera up a bit, the pir seemed to be angled to high because it didn't take any pictures for two days. So I lowered the camera and tilted up upwards again and another two days passed and no pictures. I know the deer are there daily because there are always fresh tracks and I keep dragging this spot every other day to keep the weeds out before I re-plant this food plot.

I know the camera is working fine, it senses very well but I just have to find the sweet spot so the pir isn't tilted too high
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