2011 Cuddeback Attack IR Camera Review - April 15, 2011 Back to Main Review Page
   

2011 Cuddeback Attack IR


2011 Cuddeback Attack IR 36 count low glow red flash 5mp Camera Review

09-27-2012 update (warp issue)

We had a very warm welcome from the representatives that were at the shows and it was discussed to some degree the past history of our relationship. We were really happy that they have finally got past the Capture series of cameras and produced what appears to be something special. The thing that most caught my eye is they did not fall into that mega MP thing where others push that as a strong selling point. I much rather have a three MP camera that produces great pictures than a 10 MP camera that produces less along with a file size that eats SD card space. The five MP top resolution setting (both day and night) is a great choice. The first thought when it comes out of the box is it is not a mini camera but it also is not one of the big box cameras either. It is a chip off the old log in appearance. Much like a 4 inch section of limb but in a light green/brown wood grain textured plastic with an array stuck on the front of it. It is a good looking camera if eye appeal is important to the buyer but we are forced to have to look at the appearance as a game animal might view it, this one will pass without much issue. What is somewhat different is there is a separate mount that goes on the tree and when removed from this mount there are two doors to access inside the camera. The first is on the bottom where the 4 D cell battery compartment is and the other is a rear lift up door to the simple rotary switch and two select buttons. At the top of the control compartment is the SD card slot (up to 32 gig) and there is also a separate switch to select video. (Special note, the card goes in with resistance with label up and it only goes in a short distance without any click as seen on most cameras) The camera modes are single pictures (no burst) and one picture then video plus there is a a time a lapse mode. They advertize that four D cells will give the user up to a 50K count of pictures (we assume that is the still 5 MP setting not time lapse) which is what is considered by Cuddeback as a seasons worth. There is also the 24 fps video mode which takes a picture then proceeds with the fixed 30 second video (not adjustable for length). We see that they say low red flash (out to 60 feet) and we will be taking a look at this to see if it falls into the low glow category or not. Their past history with trigger time and great pictures makes us believe we will also see that same report for this camera. 

There is a larger than normal internal memory (60MB) so if you happen to forget your card you could still deploy the camera and be able to record up to about 60 five MP pictures internally. There is a USB port where you can just carry a thumb drive with you and down load from the camera to the thumb drive and leave the card in the camera. There is also a feature that I use a bunch and that is the walk mode where there is a selected indicator on the front of the camera that will show you the area that is being covered by the PIR and you can adjust your aim very closely by observing this.

For all of you who are now into the time lapse addiction this camera should not be discounted when you do your shopping. It is single window fixed 12 seconds interval which is plenty low for most all monitoring needs. They also have their own software (included/download) to view the mass of TL pictures that are captured when using this function. This camera is a fixed 5 MP but it is my understanding and is indicated by the documentation that when TL is selected the resolution will revert to 1.3 MP. The captures in TL are pictures and not video so you can choose those you wish to select and save then and disregard the balance. 

Should this camera come anywhere close to the way we felt about the old 3.0 and 1.3 Cudde cams we started with we will be very happy. Now let’s get on with what is the big scoop with this new offering. 

We were impressed with the method that Spypoint approached leaving the camera mount on the tree where aim is always the same. Cudde did this by having a separate bracket instead of the cam in the box approach. This is called by them as being the “Genius mount”. They also went a step further to make an option of the same mount with the means of doing a tilt. These mounts can be strapped on or screwed to the tree. This will be a hot item we think so a security box should be one of the accessories one should think about along with a purchase. Their mounting brackets work with the camera only but several can be purchased and put in your favorite camera locations to make changing camera locations a bit easier. I see advertized what is called the “Attack Cuddesafe” which will fit their brackets. My opinion of this is going to have to be reserved until I learn more about it but it looks like it may not be compatible with the Python locking cable that is so popular. 

There may be a small reason for some to not consider this camera and that is the lack of adjustable resolutions, video length or maybe the sensing range. There is a switch adjustable delay down to 15 seconds. Once the rotary switch is set to a delay setting you are also in the armed condition. From that bottom setting there are a few longer delay settings 30 sec, 1 min, 3 min, 5 min, 10, min 15 min, and 30 minutes. Ours will be glued to the 15 second setting and if there was a smaller setting it would be there. 

When the Capture came out we asked about anything new being offered and now three years later we see what they meant when they said that they were in development of a new camera. Let’s hope all that home work and effort pays off because they have had a long dry spell with a lot of rough reports that were not exactly flattering. If what came out of the box and first impressions count for anything, we hoping that they will succeed this time. 

I started through the documentation as I laid things out of the box in order. The first thing I came across was the warranty and that absolutely stopped me in my tracks. It states that there is basically a one year limited warranty provided that you do not use it every day. Then there is only a six month warranty or what they call 181 run days of protection. That little fact just might be a stopper for a lot of potential users. There is obviously an internal clock on the camera to monitor number of days used. This means if you are one of that 24/7/365 kind of users then they are only going to honor their warranty for a short 181 days. We have several companies that give two years no matter the amount of use and you do not have a toll call to reach customer service either. That little bit of information does not set well with me. View the information below to see what I am taking this from.

 

 

Here are a few other things that I noticed as I studied the camera. First off is the way the batteries are installed. There is a tiny graphic near the battery lid screw hole that indicates proper battery polarity installation. It is very small and hard to see and was only found after I got a look at it with my magnifier. The little quick start folder also indicates the method with a small picture. Be sure you look closely prior to proceeding with the battery installation. I then got the main door to the controls open and first thought that the USB and SD card ports were blocked by a plastic film but a closer examination I see that it is a membrane that is cut so what ever has to be plugged in must separate the membrane on the way in to the port. I assume this is for moisture protection. The next thing is the little small printing for the switch positions is hard for old eyes to adjust to and read. The rotary switch is also very small for big hands. 

The next thing on my list of things that did not fit very well was the supplied mounting block. This is a skeleton formed plastic block that has a slot in it that will marry up with the two door screws on the back of the camera. This block just seems to not be substantial enough for any long term use (please view associated sidebar picture). The two slots for the strap to go through are only supported by one inch and three eights long by 3/32nds inch thick plastic ribs. It is actually tougher than it looks but it is still is a very flimsy application. One of our corn stealing over weight tree rats on a rampage through the air and landing on the cam would probably put the cam on the ground in a second. I have not seen their optional bracket but I would think it would be a must for most camera users if it is any better than this one. There is a 1/4X20 threaded tri-pod hole just under the main door screw which will be of little use because of its proximity to that screw. Being the mass of weight from the batteries is located at the bottom of the camera the bracket is located just behind that which gives the appearance that the top of the camera is just hanging loose in the air but is probably the very best place for its location due to the weight distribution. There is no external battery port. 

After a very quick check in our dark room, I could immediately see that this camera is far from what anyone would call “low glow or reduced glow” It is very bright and is very easy to see at an extreme distance. The duration is not long but it is not the instant blip as we see on many other cams either. So the first line in this report description above is definitely wrong. This cameras flash is as bright as any standard red flash camera we have tested. 

“Centered subject technology” is one of their selling points. This translates to a 4 foot wide area at 20 feet (that is a wedge 4 feet wide in that distance) that is the PIR’s FOV. The cameras FOV for the same distance is nearly 16 feet. This leaves a 6 foot wide area each side of the sensors field of view at that distance that could have animals there for ever and the camera would not see them. This dead zone increases in width the further from the camera you get. It is nice to have every animal centered in the picture but here in Georgia our animals have a mind of their own and just do not cooperate every time and march down the center line to get their picture taken. I would class this as being somewhat of a negative unless you developed a funnel or had every animal cross the entire FOV from one side to the other. This means aim would be highly critical provided you know exactly where the animal will travel. There is just a vast amount of real estate that is covered by the camera that is not covered by the PIR’s sensing zone. 

This cameras take on time lapse is a dawn to dusk daylight only (approximately 12 hours) which translates to 3600 pictures per day. This works out in the following way 25,200 per week and 105840 per month figuring 4.2 weeks per month. Using their figures of 50 k pictures per set of batteries average this could use a set in two weeks. The time lapse does not use flash and the file size is per picture is smaller so we expect that the picture count per battery life segment would be somewhat larger. Even at that file size it means that you may need a high capacity card in the 16 gig range to handle a couple weeks of time lapse operation. 

Having to deal with all the little small printing both on the camera and in the miniature instruction booklet I followed the instructions to download the full sized version from www.cuddeback.com/support and there was not a web site there. Maybe it only operates during the day and not in the early morning and late evening when I was trying. The lack of an 800 number for customer service is also not too keen. Repeated attempts to the address given resulted in zero. That address is for some reason out of service. The main site does not support the new manual either at this time. 

Working under my magnifier when I did the programming prior to some of my lab tests and range tests I carefully went through it a step at a time. It was straight forward and easy to do. The one thing that struck me is that this camera does not have any frills and is very basic in nature. I did a quick night and day test and the picture quality was good. I then set up a small TL test and that went well also. I will go ahead and spend the day with this thing under the microscope because we are full up with in progress cameras at this time so we are now going to have to wait for a spot in line for further testing. 

My initial tests with video had a couple of stumbles at first until I researched a little more. The included booklet just says to move the video switch to the “on” position to start to capture videos. The switch is under a rubber membrane that feels like it returns the switch to center once moved to the on position and when I did not get the camera to collect in this mode I began to think that was the reason. After searching around I found in the little quick start card where a delay must be selected prior to moving the video switch to start that mode. It look’s like the tiny booklet will probably be classed as inadequate and very lacking. (View the excerpts below) 

 

 

With the need to have this camera deployed without delay we know that we need some degree of security. As is, this camera does not have a thing that could be anyway construed as being that. Trying to make a toll call and wait those extended minutes to make an order I decided to take one of Chucks Custom One’s excellent angle brackets and just adapt it to this camera which worked out great. With an eye bolt into the tripod insert and through the bracket along with a double wrap through the bracket and eye bolt with a Python it is secure. The eye bolt can be easily removed to access the camera and the python crosses the camera below the PIR. Problem solved and no calls or waiting for a shipment to continue the review. 

 

04-16-2011 update:  I did the leak test and that went well plus the drop test and it survived. Where it failed was the filter clunk test. The IR cut filter snaps at the transition and is very audible, even to my old ears. The good thing is it only happens at the transition and not with each picture so twice a day it will make this clunk. That is too bad because it is exactly at the prime time to get pictures at first and last light which is prime movement times.

04-17-2011 update:  I have discussed what amounts to a large amount of issues that was just found by doing some very basic testing and reading during the initial phase of this review. What has not been said is that what this camera does it seems to do pretty well. It will probably show that is has a trigger time that is less than a second. It will show that the picture/video quality is very acceptable. Being very basic in function it has to do what it does in a standard that is seen in a positive light. Should this company change and become a little more customer friendly and accessible with 800 prefix phone numbers and a full warranty I can see asking the $240+ price tag. I took a trip to our local book store which is a large national chain. I scanned most all of the outdoor hunting magazines and found the large full color slick ads about this camera. I think that the cost of just a couple of those ads would go a long way towards upgrading phone communications and not push everything over to internet mail as the means to circumvent having to have the standard 800 service that all other companies have. Maybe a price tag of around $ 150 would be more in line for what you get.

04-17-2011 update #2:  We performed the trigger tests and this camera is extremely fast with the time without flash at about a tenth of a second and with flash about a quarter of a second. We moved to the day range and set up and today is a nice cool day that is less than 70 degrees and our sensing range came in about 50 feet and only dead center of the range. Just a couple of feet off center and the camera would not trigger. The day range photos lacked a bit of contrast and were a little fuzzy. During our recent photo contest I had the task of viewing literally a ton of scouting pictures from all brands of cameras. Some of which were from the Capture model which is the predecessor to this camera. I found many of those entries by that camera to be better than what this particular camera is giving us. A zoom on the 8 plate had a degree of fuzziness also. The color was a bit starved also and a quick test in one of our photo enhancement programs where I kicked in a very small bit of contrast, things got much better. I expected to see from the advertisement a picture that just grabbed me and I would say “damn that is a great picture” but I did not. My recent review of the $160 Moultrie M-100 did however make me say that about its pictures. Its trigger time is over just a second and also has adjustable video length with sound, Adjustable windows in time lapse, and multiple picture/video resolutions. I hate to say this but our opinion of this camera is sliding down hill the more we get into it.

04-19-2011 update:  This morning during my trip through the vast forest of outdoor forums I noticed where one individual had gone to a Cabelas store and he stated that they were promoting the camera and were selling them for $195 each. That is thirty dollars cheaper but not quite down to the figure we picked. We are still waiting for field reports to do a comparison between their findings and ours to ensure that this individual camera is not one of those stuffed out to the consumer with out a good amount or prerelease testing. What I did read in more than one place is that there are individuals waiting on our review results prior to turning their hard earned money loose on a purchase. We have it farmed out on a tree over looking some corn piles that are both on and off center of the field of view. Those corn piles that disappear that are just a couple feet off center with no pictures will also verify our extensive walk sensing tests that we have performed. Another confusing thought was gained by our review announcement on our forum where after several days we had only 31 hits on the Attack thread and threads on the Stealth Archers Choice and Moultrie M-100 advanced over a hundred in the same time. There just seems to be very little interest in this camera. Width the thousands of viewers per day on our forum we would have thought we would see a higher read count. The trend toward $4 gas probably is taking away some of the play thing money and making it necessary to address the needs of home and family instead of cameras could be part of the reason. 

The night range test gave us a bit of a strange effect also. Even though our aim was a bit high we had a tremendous amount of splash on the ground in front of the camera and IR burn on the 20 foot target. Even though the night photos are fuzzy, there is a lot of light going down range. It appears that the flash aim is low compared to the cameras aim.

04-20-2011 update:  Logged another day and was able to get a few sample pictures (see below). We can now prove that the center technology is very effective for just that. We performed a walk test at 30 feet back and forth at the slowest walk we could do. The camera caught the walker every time but only with in a three foot area directly in the center line. Anthony took those results and made a GIF showing the sensing area. Any activity outside that center line that went on was not captured. We have the video mode left to test and show samples and then we are going to close this review.

04-20-2011 update:  Again deployed this time in video and we managed to get our samples. There seems to be a problem here also. We are using a Kingston class 2 two gig card and in a lot of cases it will only take the picture and then will not advance on to take the video and in other cases the video files have zero bytes. We did see where something could trigger the camera and was present and then walk away leaving a good portion of the fixed 30 second video empty. It would have been nice to have the video length adjustable. A positive issue is that the M4V files (we assume mpeg4 compression) are very small in comparison to other camera videos by as much as one tenth. The samples are posted below. We have really wanted this camera to shine but as you can see we have had some issues with the design. The communications earlier in the year made us feel that we were really going to have a prize to work with. The very pleasant approach by the company was a welcome site. The products hit the market and we never received the early samples which puzzled us. Even though we draw from the vendors along with some company shipped samples, (for comparison) the samples never arrived and the market was already selling the IR version. Our memory of the old 3.0 camera from this company was always pretty good but I went ahead and went back and reviewed what I had written and then I actually pulled one of ours out and set it back up. There is a very near parallel, especially with the pencil beam sensing. The old 3.0 also was plagued by that same feature. What feed back that I have received since I have started this review all mainly has dealt with the poor sensing and the other main complaint was the warranty. With more companies going to two year warranties, this company went down to just six months for the full time users. There has also been some noise about the video length. We suggest that if first you don’t succeed Skydiving is not for you time to take off the chute or re invent a better means of landing. This review is closed.

04-22-2011 update:  I had a very strange phone call from someone who claimed to represent one of the major catalog retailers. He felt that we had been too critical as to this camera. He strongly announced that he personally knew that the camera was much better than what we had stated. I then ask just what his findings were during his personal tests. He said that he had yet to see one and based his comment purely from what he had read and understood about this camera. I told him that I understood what he was saying and that I also noticed that in this case the power of advertizing was very convincing. His point was that he felt that this early release of data about products would degrade sales. My point to him was we are consumer oriented though we absolutely wish all camera companies well. I went on and further stated that all we did was report the facts and these were that there. First was this business about the 6 month warranty. Then there was the issue about the center line sensing and PIR function resulting in missed captures. If the camera does not see the target it will not take the picture no matter how great all other features are. Other areas discussed involved video length and picture quality. The balance of the conversation dealt with customer service and lack of non toll free telephone numbers forcing customers to either pay (put on hold on the customer’s dime) for phone conversations or try to communicate through the internet. The tail end of this conversation was at a much better tone and he began to understand. My final question was “as a consumer would he want to purchase something and then find out that the advertizing hype did not tell the whole story and you had spent your hard earned money for something that was different than the impression you had gleaned from that media?”  It got very quiet on the other end but it was my take that he fully understood. I would have loved to have given a five star rating but we must let the chips fall where they do.

04-22-2011 update #2:  After my call last night we had a Cuddeback representative visit our forum and post on one of our threads. I have a feeling there is a lot of strange winds blowing across the Wisconsin landscape and all of a sudden things start to happen. There are some proposed changes coming like really implementing the web site that was discussed in the review within the next month or so. Along with that change there was mention of a possibility of changing warranty procedures and maybe how firmware is done and implemented. We will not publish any of this until it does become a fact. The brochures are already out along with all the catalogs and that information is what the consumer is going to be going by along with our review to make their purchase. We feel that this announcement of sort on our forum is very much in a positive direction, we will still have to wait until we actually see it implemented before we can formally try to report anything different than what we have reported in the review. We went through that scenario last year with another company and went ahead and announced and the changes were never made. Should by chance all of this does come to light it will be a vast improvement although there was only a mention that the primary onus dealing with the sensing zone was only being put up for discussion and not for change. This was part of the forum input by the representative:

“We think customers prefer scouting cameras that record images of all deer/animals that pass in front of the camera, not just some of them, or the slow moving ones."

This statement in front of the camera evidently means the three feet wide line directly in front of the camera and having to actually cross. We feel that the in front of the camera is within the cameras field of view. As designed the slow ones could be in that zone for a week and still never have their picture taken unless they strayed into that center area. This correction would require a hardware change and I just don’t believe that is going to happen during this coming year, but as they said “it is going to be discussed”. As I entered above, “this review is closed” and when ever changes are actually made and time allows we will enter as much of that information that we can gather.

04-25-2011 update:

5.0 mega pixel custom color camera for day shots
• Infrared night pictures
• Fast 1/4 second trigger time

• Accepts SD Memory Cards (up to 32GB)
Invisible infrared flash – 60 ft range
• Day/night-video clips (30 sec)
• Video Plus includes still image with every video
• Time Lapse Mode (5 images per minute during day)
• 8 Time Out Settings (15 sec - 30 minutes)
• "No Flash" Uses 36 Infrared Emitters to illuminate
• Power Source 4 D-cell batteries  
• Includes Genius Mount System with easy on/off 
• 6 Month Warranty

• Model 1156

 

Notice the above ad and it is only one of a number that was brought to my attention where they are selling this camera as having an invisible flash. This is absolutely wrong and this IR camera is only qualified as being labeled a standard red flash. Although they did get the warranty correct. This is probably very much like some of the claims we have seen in some of the previous advertizing by Predator cameras. From the pre release data, catalogs and the booklet I originally thought that it would qualify as being “low glow” but after the first trigger I found it was a plain old red flash, just like its predecessors. This company needs to get hold of their vendors and have that changed or they might get a flood of not so happy customers thinking they were buying something else.

 

04-28-2011 update:  We did get some reports that a small change was made but we also have other reports of  the flash “that is invisible to deer” but it appears that there is a little work being done to make things more accurate. The work in progress seems to be moving in the right direction but it is still a long way from being finished.  It has been over 1/3 of the year of the announcement and one of the new owners (in the process of returning the unit) told me that it was beyond his understanding that the only means of official information (other than a toll call) was by going to their web site which (according to him) has yet to even mention the existence of the Attack camera. I did a quick check this morning of that site and did not see anything except some information about the old 2010 cameras. There was some mention in their note that there would be another site coming soon. Somewhere some of the priorities have been let slide and again this year the customer seems to be only needed for sales without a timely/occasional web site update where up to date factual information could be obtained. This was needed prior to release or at least equal to or a day or two after.  Another glance at our forum note makes us think that the priorities will change, but when. “Over the past years, Cuddeback has continued to grow and increase sales. In fact, the company is 5 times bigger today than it was 5 or 6 years ago. We want to thank all our customers for your support.”

04-30-2011 update:  One other minor issue has popped up and that is that the time lapse software has not yet been released by Cudde and this leaves all the time lapse users without a means to handle their hoard of pictures. One of the fellows told me that he was attempting using the plot watcher software for his but I have not tried this to see if it would work. The only other option would be to go to a much better after market method which is our Scouting Assistant software. It incorporates an advanced means of picking out only the frames that have a change in them so there is no need to view frame after frame of the exact same image. It will also do all the other things that you will need when handling your trail camera pictures. It is that it just does it in a logical and superior manner. That amounts to a kick in the SA software’s direction but the current Attack users should not have to wait for for something that should have been in the package at the time of the sale.  Visit www.scoutingassistant.com for details on our software solution.

05-11-2011 update:  I had several notes this morning about this camera and what they amounted to was that there appears to be very little change in the warranty situation and it still remains at six months for full time users. There is some noises that you can make an on line registration (caution not secure) and get 18 months provided that you have a computer. Stick a set of batteries in your new camera and test it then put it up to be deployed in the fall several months later and then you will find out that the instant you did that first setup your warranty clock started on your camera. All of this after the fact movement so far has not set well with the potential buyers that have communicated with us recently. It looks like an end run around the same old play and now we are on the 4th down and still looking at 99 yards to go.

05-13-2011 update:  Had this camera on a little back yard tool guard duty mission being my best little Acorn had after a year ate all the juice out of the batteries. This cam still had some power left so I thought I would give it a try. Check the below picture and you will see the new home of the famous back yard pest the “fire ant” who was in the process of filling this hole up with what looked like sand. I had to remove the cover and wash it to get things back in order. It is time to retire this unit from any southern duty. I made the trip and got new groceries for my reliable Lt. Acorn and it is back out watching the shop.

We have received a note that some feel that it may be the users fault for allowing the fire ants to enter the hole in the camera. We tried very hard to train those little devils to stay away but being the manufacturer provided the neat little access port to an internal compartment we just did not have much success with that training. Maybe most would feel that it was possibly the designer’s fault that this access was built into the camera. We just find the problems we do not invent the problems. 

05-27-2011 update:  Even though we have closed the review on this camera we still are receiving mail with pro’s and con’s about this camera. For some reason it seems that there have been some that tend to read over the review and only pick out the negative aspects of the review and never allow the positive mention’s to also be counted. 

Here are some of the positive traits. Trigger time is very fast, flash is pretty good, picture quality is good but not great, 15 second min delay, camera does video, camera does time lapse, camera is switch based for easy setup, and camera has an advertized great battery life. 

Here are some negative traits, Warranty, company had pushed their version until we pointed out the deficiency and then they made a change??. Mounting bracket is very flimsy, Sensing is very narrow and does not cover 90% of the cameras field of view. small hard to read print and very small knobs. open orifice for insects to enter part of the camera, transition IR cut filter clunk, no 800 phone service to customer service. strong company push to make every issue to be handled on line including warranty. Long on hold waits to speak to customer service on the one non toll telephone number they have for this purpose. 

Everything above is strong consumer concerns and facts that have been reported as we see them. This company has had a following in the past and there are a few that just will not accept any information outside of their own. We only report and the decision to purchase should be your own.  The shill proponent on a couple of the forums that has been causing problems about this has now been traced back and identified as a representative who distributes Cuddeback cameras and other items like archery equipment for the Wisconsin area. It is a shame because history is repeating itself all over again with this camera.

05-29-2011 update:  Shill, shill, shill, they are very hard at work. The warranty issue now is the subject of the day. What I can say is instead of enjoying my BBQ ribs on this holiday weekend I have been at work contacting my sources, which tell me that the camera is still being shipped with the same warranty data in the box and no change has been made. We are sure that Cudde will eventually get around to it but until they do we are going to have to maintain that many will read the included warranty information and believe that is the way it is. There is still no mention of on line registration and 18 months. Forum followers and our site members know that it is now 18 months but there are sure to be many who do not know that.

06-02-2011 update:  During this past long weekend I ran a check on the warranty update at dealers and found there are packages of cameras that still have the 6 month warranty inside. This morning I am getting word that there are packages arriving at dealers that reflect an 18 month warranty sticker on the outside of the package. I understand this is still only good when done on line.

08-09-2011 update:  We make our purchases from a rotating file which has all of the camera vendors listed. This week we are ready for our next series of cameras to be tested in late August and early September. The next two vendors that came up for our next purchases were Bass Pro and Cabelas. While scrolling through their camera selections I happened come across a series of user reviews for the IR version Attack. After you are through digesting what has been written above then take a short trip through these two vendor reviews that were written by a wide selection of users through out the US. There are some positive but many reflect some of the issues we pointed out in this review. Many have issues that we did not find. It very much appears that this company is still busy trying to do updates to get ahead of the storm of complaints.  What is also very strange is that they are getting hammered even on their own forum http://cuddetalk.com/ the cuddetalk forum which was started just to service anything cuddeback cameras and no other brands. There was a mention of a Bushnell camera and they blessed him out for that mention. So if you choose to talk about Moultrie cameras, Stealth cameras, WGI cameras, HCO cameras, Uway cameras, Recon cameras, or others like Reconyx cameras you would not be allowed to comment. This is fine just as long as they take care of the hoard of cuddeback camera complaints.

08-12-2011 update:  It seems that now there is a lot of attention being given to these negative posts on their forum we now see that those posts are being deleted shortly after they are posted on cuddetalk. It appears that they are paying far more attention to this than their incoming phone lines and internet support. This is sad because they could have probably gone a long ways early this year if they had maybe had other policies.

After a couple of weeks, our reports on the cuddetalk forum (now nick named the “poof forum”) because anything posted about a cuddeback camera issue that is negative in nature gets the “poof” treatment and is deleted. We understand that some serious users (loyal) have left because of this practice. The avenues of access should I would think, be relaxed and opened up to the management then it would appear that they are serious about getting their customer base back and maybe the negativity would then disappear. This is getting to be a very old story and we are tired of saying anything but the daily ratio of mail on this subject is such that we have to at least try to allow the consumer to make his/her own decision. This camera has been reviewed for this year and it is strictly up to the potential buyer to make the choice. We are only a couple months away from getting the first of the 2012 (or the news there of) cameras so maybe one of them will be a good story with a Cuddeback name on it that we can tell.

09-27-2012 update:  We have had some reports of the Attack camera back door warping after some field use. When tightened down tight the rubber seal causes the door to warp and the center section of the seal will fail. This in turn will allow water inside the camera and fill up in the area at the bottom area where the SD card slot is once removed from the plastic mount and turned up to open the back door. Say good by to function. All of our test units including our most recently released unit seem to have this problem. Warm summer weather seems to be fine but warm days and cool/cold nights seems to make this problem worse.

12-19-2012 update:  The water leak to the control area inside the door issue seems to be having more frequent reports. This will cause the camera to quit working. One of the main indicators is having a camera that has the flash going off about every 15 seconds. Others just shut down and cannot be restarted even after a good dry out.

 

 

Trigger Tests
(without flash .12 seconds)

(with flash .23 seconds)

 

Flash Range
(camera only)

Day Range/8 Plate

5mp Photo samples

Video Samples (m4v format originals)
Note: Our computers did not natively recognize this format.  also trying to play these in a browser may lock your browser up as mine does.  Best to right click and "save target as"

Video Sample 1

Video Sample 2

Video Sample 3

Video Sample 4




 

 

   
   
   
   

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