This is the place to share all the cool pictures & movies you get from your trail cameras. In other words, if it's not a picture or movie related to a camera problem, it goes here. If it is a picture or movie related to a camera problem, please post it in the appropriate manufacturer forum.
User avatar
By Anthony
#357903
I sent a Verizon Lookout Dual to a customer in Michigan. He has it deployed over some minerals and this bear came in but didn't demolish my camera. I sure hope he is done with it. The camera is in a lock box and the Ridgetec Solar Power Pack is 12 feet above the camera (10AH LiFePO4 + 10W panel).

User avatar
By Anthony
#357904
Camera setup on this tree with solar panel, bracket, and power box facing south on the backside of the tree.
Attachments
25459.jpeg
25459.jpeg (244.94 KiB) Viewed 3313 times
25461.jpeg
25461.jpeg (262.33 KiB) Viewed 3313 times
By Saskboy
#357906
I wonder in bear country if it would be best to run two external antennas higher up. They might not chew on cables as quickly as antennas. Or maybe ridgetec can come up with a built in capacitor you charge prior to going into the field, 120v single use per charge bear zapper on the outside of the box lol.
User avatar
By Anthony
#357907
Yes a built in bear zapper is a good idea. good for rodents too.

I was thinking if the external antennas used a 90 degree adapter, then ran to the side and the up. Maybe they would leave it alone. same thoughts crossed my mind.
User avatar
By Anthony
#357910
Woody S wrote: Tue Jul 23, 2019 4:11 pm A bear would make short work of those two antennas sticking up -- that's one of the reasons why I have no interest in a camera that can send its photos to me. It would deal with the solar panel too.
I began to brain storm on ideas for making the antennas less fragile (true of all cellular cams). My first idea was to use say a 10 foot sma extension cable with a short 90 degree at the camera itself and then simply move the stock antennas up into the air.

this would minimize the stress at the antenna junction on top of the camera while possibly increasing the signal. I spoke with the antenna company that makes our omni and directional antennas. they explained that the longer the cable the greater the loss of db or gain.

So I think a 10 to 15 foot cheap cable to accomplish both goals is out.

However this got me to thinking... what if I had a short pigtail with a 90 degree on top of the camera and another 90 degree on the other end. This could nearly eliminate the stress point on top of the camera while allowing the antennas to flex and flop. My hopes are that the short cable would retain a "memory" and if bent over would pop back into place slike a spring. If short enough would have minimal effect on signal.

Basically make the antennas "childproof" by allowing them to flex and spring back into position. Any thoughts ?

If the antennas are bit or chewed off, and the camera is saved, they are easily and cheaply replaced. This is a better result than potentially damaging the camera.
By Saskboy
#357911
I think the best solution would be to have the steel box a little taller than it needs to be at the top, this would allow you to have a 90 coming off the camera with a wire slipping straight out the back or corner of the box. The wire would bend up or be routed around the backside of the tree, whichever way the bear wouldnt notice it as much. Basically you have to protect the camera and the 90 from any damage or pulling, inside the box could have a small loop that the cable can grab to prevent the cable from getting tugged on inside the box when a bear does grab hold of the antenna and reefs on it.
By Saskboy
#357912
Or..... same idea with the taller box idea, but mount the antennas to the top of the box on a spring loaded base with a very short jumper wire inside the box that connect them to the camera. The spring mount would let the antennas fold over easily and pop back up into place after hes done screwing with them. Have the antenna plastic body be manufactured with some sort of awful tasting chemical, just like they make nail polish with disgusting tasting crap in it for kids to prevent them chewing their nails.
User avatar
By Anthony
#357914
I just read that bears hate clorox or ammonia smell. How about one of those drips like you use for slow release doe urine but allow it to dribble down the tree right above the camera with ammonia?

Essentially treat the problem not the symptom ?

Or I can add a button in the mobile app labelled "Horn". When you get a bear pic, you tap the Horn button and the camera sends a signal to an IR activated super horn/Siren. :mrgreen:
By Saskboy
#357916
I think ultimately it would be amazing if you simply added an aux port that would create a closed loop when a command was sent to it, complete with an adjustable time limit. Then the sky is the limit for all the crap the user could connect to that thing......... I've got all sorts of ideas for Anthony to blow his cash.
User avatar
By Woody S
#357917
Given that a bear somehow took a padlock off a CAMLOCKBox and took the front cover off the box (you can watch the video here -- https://forestandfield.blogspot.com/201 ... allow.html), I really doubt that any antenna or wire outside a steel box would survive for the nine months bears are active around here. I don't have a count of all the photos my cameras have taken of the inside of a bear's mouth and almost all my steel boxes and Python locks have been gnawed by gray squirrels -- I suspect they'd make short work of antennas and cables too.
User avatar
By reaperman
#357919
I agree ammonia would keep most things away from the camera but it may also spook animals in general. One thing I know that keeps rodents away is HOT pepper sauce sprayed on something you don’t want to get chewed up. I know farmers who use it on tractors to keep mice from chewing wires.
User avatar
By Anthony
#357920
Woody S wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:38 pm Given that a bear somehow took a padlock off a CAMLOCKBox and took the front cover off the box (you can watch the video here -- https://forestandfield.blogspot.com/201 ... allow.html), I really doubt that any antenna or wire outside a steel box would survive for the nine months bears are active around here. I don't have a count of all the photos my cameras have taken of the inside of a bear's mouth and almost all my steel boxes and Python locks have been gnawed by gray squirrels -- I suspect they'd make short work of antennas and cables too.
well, your bears are just plain mean :mrgreen:
More PA bucks and a coyote

Me to Reaperman, our season starts in October. Bes[…]

PA Bear and a buck

Boly new 4G Cellular Camera

Could you send me a PM with one of this batteries?[…]

All my cams are in boxes... and plenty of them hav[…]