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#108093
If you go to the website shown on the business card and use the part #'s shown below the card they will fit. They are a very unusual size and hard to find. If I recall they are 1.75x4.75,but just check the part #'s on his website.
What connectors did you use with the RG58U for the extension? I'm terrible recognizing connectors.

When you get to the website scroll down to power cords and then over to coaxial power plug and socket. The size is 1.7mm x 4.75mm. The website is http://www.kenselectronics.com
The part #'s are CR30-635 and PH-263
#112291

I'm kinda confused, Jack.. Are ya sayin' that more, directional and higher power LED's would not make any difference in the flash output if place at the same location as the camera :? ??????


First, I'm sorry I didn't answer your question previously. I must have missed it. I just ran across the post while searching for something else.

What I'm trying to say is this:

It takes a lot more power to produce the same level of flash at non-visible frequencies than it does to produce the equivalent flash with "red blob". The problem is non-linear (even with red blob). You need to produce a lot more light to get just a little more flash distance. The Reconyx RC60HO and BEC XIR are probably getting all the flash distance possible within practical limits of power. You quickly get to a point where it is impractical (no impossible) to provide enough power to increase flash distance much beyond what we are seeing now.

If you could place a flash physically closer to the subject, you get around this non-linear relationship. So, with current technology and power sources, you could improve flash distance by placing part of the flash (the camera resident LEDs) at the camera, and a slave flash (like the Xtender-B) closer to the subject. Using a cable between the slave flash and the camera is limiting, but it could provide a functional solution.

Thanks,

Jack
#112315
Would this work
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... K:MEWAX:IT


You got the concept. Wireless white slave flashes have been around a long time. This type plugs into a camera shoe and transmits a signal to the slave over RF. I have seen others that do an optical detection and have no transmitter at the camera. This is similar to how the Xtender works. The difference is that white flash is a lot easier to detect and differentiate from the background noise. That is why the Xtender uses the sensor cable. The cone acts as a spatial filter to improve the SNR fro detection.

A similar device to the one you link to but that got it's trigger from the camera (either trigger-out or optically) and had a black slave flash would do the trick.

Thanks,

Jack
#112324
I was thinking if you cut the Plug off the Sensor cable from the Xtendr and used the end from the Sync cord that comes with the Wireless flash trigger to wire the Transmitter to the Uway Sensor Cable. Then use the Plug that you cut from the Sensor cable to wire the Xtendr to the Receiver.
I went ahead and bought one to try. Probably wont get it for 1-2 weeks
#112330
I was thinking if you cut the Plug off the Sensor cable from the Xtendr and used the end from the Sync cord that comes with the Wireless flash trigger to wire the Transmitter to the Uway Sensor Cable. Then use the Plug that you cut from the Sensor cable to wire the Xtendr to the Receiver.
I went ahead and bought one to try. Probably wont get it for 1-2 weeks


got ya. I went back and looked at the specs more closely. You might just have something here! If this works, it would cover 90% of the cases.

I'm guessing this device is intended for uses with SLR type cameras. I wonder if the "sleep mode" on the transmitter will be a problem. It also talks about a 0.01 mA current and battery. I'm guessing it is drawing that current from the shoe.

If you can make this work with the Xtender-B, you'll be pushing black flash capability a great leap forward.

Please keep me informed about how this goes!

Thanks,

Jack
#112336
The transmitter uses a 12v mini battery and the receiver uses aaa type batts. these units are made for a pulse type signal, just connecting a circuit and creating the flash and then they are done. typically leds will come on a split second before the camera starts recording so that they are at full illumination by the time the camera is on. I think in picture mode that the flash will have already come and gone before the camera starts to record and I don't think it's going to work at all in video mode. I hope I'm wrong on this but I'm thinking that's how it's going to work.
#112349
The camera doesn't need to detect that far away, but mine will depending on the target. The BEC has a narrow long distance PIR. I can see all kinds of lighting options including overhead and back-lighting. The 30' meter number just comes from the range of the device, not a specific need. It just turns out to be about right.
#112632
Anthony,
Have you tried the Extendir-B with the Reconyx RC60HO yet? I am curious to see if it gives any greater lighting.

The other cam on my list is a Buckeye Apollo. I am curious how the IR version would enhance it's pics. I was always disappointed by it's flash range for the money spent on this camera.
#112635
Anthony,
Have you tried the Extendir-B with the Reconyx RC60HO yet? I am curious to see if it gives any greater lighting.

The other cam on my list is a Buckeye Apollo. I am curious how the IR version would enhance it's pics. I was always disappointed by it's flash range for the money spent on this camera.


Sorry, I will set that up tonight. I have had the RC60 in another comparative sensing test all week and concluded this this morning.
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