Trail Camera Discussion of Manufactured Cameras.
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By Anthony
#352525 I have always thought that rubs were a precursor to full rut and that scrapes were maintained prior to and during rut as a territorial marker.

But I may be wrong. Maybe a scientist will kick in on this one.
By Sodbuster
#352566 Wouldn't waste time on rubs or scrapes during the rut . Bucks are here today gone tomorrow. You can still get a few pics in these areas if you have extra cams, but I would focus on doe feeding and bedding areas to get the most buck pics. Rut is pretty much over here and any good bucks are dead or gone til next year :cry:
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By C.A.M.O.
#352587 Most definitely agree with Sodbuster.

Rick! :D
By picdic
#352657 it would be cool to get video of a guy using a rub, but I doubt it would be a productive spot for a cam.
i'm still finding no sign of rutting in my whitetail area. I know the muleys are rutting, where I usually chase them. and here I am again, wasting all my time on dirty whitetails. no rubs, no checking out scent-spots, no nothing. does running around with no bucks following, and all the bucks are just walking around at night.
I agree, put the cams on the doe-zones for best productiveness.
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By Anthony
#352670 This may not be totally related but I have always heard that temperature is a big factor in addition to "that time of the year" for rutting behavior. In other words a cold snap at the right time will have the bucks rutting on schedule but warmer weather pushes rut farther into December rather than the typical November time frame here in Georgia.

Climate Change may be somewhat to blame for your lack of rutting activity. Trump is also to blame.
By picdic
#352680 I've also always assumed a good cold snap usually gets it going.
up here where we get long and cold winters with deep snow, I have heard people mention what really determines when the rut happens. it is based around their gestation period, which is 200 days. that means that they have to rut around a certain date to ensure the fawns aren't born too early in poor weather/conditions. and they can't be born too much later than a certain date, as they need to be grown enough by the time the bad weather starts again in the fall. so may/june is when they give birth, so early/mid November is probably the standard rutting action. but I still think weather can affect it. I guess it's not out of the norm too much for them to rut late.