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User avatar
By trailcamcover.com
#355682 If you had moisture damage to your cameras, I got a product to help shield rain and snow from getting inside the camera. Check out the TrailCam Cover at trailcamcover.com
I got additional life from my cameras keeping the water out from around the gasket and front crevices.
If someone is interested or wants more information also contact me at trailcamcover@gmail.com
User avatar
By Anthony
#355691 IN our experience a hood can reduce the amount of light going into the day night sensor and affect light metering in transition times for sure on some cameras.
User avatar
By reaperman
#355699 I'm all for invention and creativity and someone trying to capitalize from a product. However, a lot of trail camera owners like their cameras to be discrete. This produce would hamper the camo factor.
User avatar
By reaperman
#355704
csb wrote:Reaperman, what does a lock box do?

Did you see the cover? It has a much larger footprint than a lock box does. I just know plenty of trail camera owners who would rather put their trust in the cameras ability to keep water out rather than expose their units to would be thieves. I would never discourage anyone from purchasing what they wish.
User avatar
By Richard Thompson
#355896 For weather protection, you should pay attention to the tech spec of trail cameras carefully before you pay for it. For example, when I was hesitating to buy WingHome trail camera 290C, I check for the tech spec one by one, it's said "IP66", which means it has been certificated to prevent water, dust and even critters.
User avatar
By WoodsWatcher
#355907
Richard Thompson wrote:For weather protection, you should pay attention to the tech spec of trail cameras carefully before you pay for it. For example, when I was hesitating to buy WingHome trail camera 290C, I check for the tech spec one by one, it's said "IP66", which means it has been certificated to prevent water, dust and even critters.


Are those made by Boly? Saw the cam opened up showing the screen and controls or whatever, on Youtube. Looks just like my Cabela's which is Boly. WingHome is cheaper but would need to see more pics and videos to get interested.
User avatar
By trailcamcover.com
#355908 Its been many years taking photos in the outdoors, always using a protective cover for my cameras, dealing with moisture, falling objects, animal tampering, harsh outdoor elements. Personally I've made 100s of homemade covers, but wanted a cover that was durable and protective...some help before replacing a camera.
The TrailCamCover was designed to aid in the photo opportunity, the photos I get using the cover haven't changed, the clarity, brightness and other characteristics are not impeded, there are slots in the rear that allow you to raise or lower the cover if needed. I was pretty happy with the results and wanted to share with others.
The cover is 6x5x5 (lxwxh) fitting many size cameras. The material is easy to modify, using a "step" bit to make the antenna hole for cellular cameras. Honestly, it will not reduce appearance in the woods, I conceal mine with camouflage paint colors and a maple leaf cluster.

The photo is two tom's showing off, enjoy.
http://tinypic.com/r/4tog7n/9

The photo is fawn and velvet buck, where's mom, enjoy.
http://tinypic.com/r/8wxzdk/9
User avatar
By Ol Arky
#355920 I have several cameras that have security boxes but I've come to the conclusion that it's nearly as economical to buy the cheap wally world tasco's ($28.88 plus tax less 3% if I order online and pay with my wally world mastercard) and just strap um to a tree anywhere I want to... So far the only camera I've had that got wet inside was one I forgot and left it unlatched after replacing the card... Old folks do stupid things like that...
I don't think I'll buy anything other than the cheap tasco's again since they take good enough picture for me and I can buy 6 or 8 of them for the same price of 1 higher priced camera, a security box, lock and stainless steel lag bolts to attach it to a tree... Thus not causing any damage whatsoever to any tree...
User avatar
By trailcamcover.com
#355989
WoodsWatcher wrote:What if the cam uses those bungee cords instead of a strap..


WoodsWatcher,
Run the bungee cord through two rear holes made with a "step" drill bit, you'll modify the cover to accommodate unique mountings (bungee cord, etc.). The cover is engineered thermoplastic, it cuts well with a any type metal/wood drill bit. Extremely durable, high strength, high heat distortion temperature material.

Use a step bit for a precision hole: (bungee or antenna hole configurations)
https://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quart ... 44460.html" target="_blank

Use an aviation snip for long cuts (exposure requirements):
https://www.harborfreight.com/heavy-dut ... 90718.html" target="_blank

For example, certain Wildgame cameras have a bungee cord fastener; place the camera squarely in the cover, mark location of the bungee connectors, drill hole the diameter of the bungee cord. If needed, slot the hole (vertically) for fine adjustments.
User avatar
By trailcamcover.com
#355990
Ol Arky wrote:I have several cameras that have security boxes but I've come to the conclusion that it's nearly as economical to buy the cheap wally world tasco's ($28.88 plus tax less 3% if I order online and pay with my wally world mastercard) and just strap um to a tree anywhere I want to... So far the only camera I've had that got wet inside was one I forgot and left it unlatched after replacing the card... Old folks do stupid things like that...
I don't think I'll buy anything other than the cheap tasco's again since they take good enough picture for me and I can buy 6 or 8 of them for the same price of 1 higher priced camera, a security box, lock and stainless steel lag bolts to attach it to a tree... Thus not causing any damage whatsoever to any tree...


Ol Arky,
I use the cheaper cameras myself, as they take nice photos and videos. My success with these cameras is keeping them dry as possible, they hold up well until getting wet, fogging the flash and lens area, then the photo quality is no more. For extended life place a camera cover to shield the heavy rain and sitting snow, preventing water penetration into the camera body. For maintenance, use a light coat of Vaseline on the gasket area and place a small desiccant bag inside the battery area to absorb moisture.
I also prefer a "strap" to mount my cameras, the strap adjusts easily, as you mention, it does not harm the tree, it a win, win.